NATIK PARTNER:
YO’ONIK LEARNING CENTER

Every Scholar is a Tutor
in the Making

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Natik provides Yo’onik Learning Center in Zinacantán with study stipends and educational workshops. We have funded 30 year-long scholars with study stipends since 2012.

Every year, many students in Zinacantán drop out of school after the sixth grade. Many families cannot support having children who attend school. Natik and partner Yo’onik identify dedicated students and funds their schooling. These exceptional youth learn valuable leadership skills through training and supervision. Older scholars also tutor younger children at Yo’onik Learning Center in Maya Tzotzil, the language of their village rather than the unfamiliar Spanish taught in their school. In doing so, the younger students are culturally affirmed, and the older students gain important organizational, administrative, and creative teaching skills.

Natik identifies and finds resources for Yo’onik to offer classes and workshops. We’ve helped facilitate classes and workshops in photography, videography, technology, English language classes, organic gardening, composting latrines, low-smoke stoves, and even the cultivation of nutritious backyard crops.


We know which students are tutored at Yo’onik Center. They’re so far ahead of their classmates!
— Teacher, Escuela Primaria Melchor Ocampo, Zinacantán, Chiapas, Mexico

Chiapas, Mexico is a land of natural beauty, abundance and diverse cultural heritage. It is home to a large indigenous Mayan population as well as a Spanish-speaking majority. Chiapas’ rural villages lack basic infrastructure such as schools, health care, potable water, and sanitation. Faced with religious and political conflict as well as lack of economic opportunity, many choose to migrate to the cities. However, even in cities many indigenous people remain marginalized because they lack formal education and the crucial ability to speak, read, or write Spanish.

Chiapas, Mexico is a land of natural beauty, abundance and diverse cultural heritage. It is home to a large indigenous Mayan population as well as a Spanish-speaking majority. Chiapas’ rural villages lack basic infrastructure such as schools, health care, potable water, and sanitation. Faced with religious and political conflict as well as lack of economic opportunity, many choose to migrate to the cities. However, even in cities many indigenous people remain marginalized because they lack formal education and the crucial ability to speak, read, or write Spanish.